Skip to main content
This section shall specify the purpose for the renovation or demolition project. Specific details concerning the project shall include the phasing and scheduling details including start and completion dates. The overview shall outline any phasing required during the project and identify the materials associated with each phase, the location, and the amount of material. The scope of work shall be specific to include any specialty requirements for each area or phase, and any demolition activities required by the abatement contractor. Please Note: The designer shall incorporate all items included in the abatement specification itemized on the bid document on a per square foot basis, per linear footage or items on a per item basis and a cost associated with remobilization to the site.

The work schedule shall reflect any anticipated shift work, number of shifts scheduled and the time associated with each shift. The work schedule shall state that the University of North Carolina and/or Project Designer shall approve deviations of the work schedule listed below:

Schedule Date Supplied
Project Start Date Insert Date
Daily Work Schedule _________a.m. through __________p.m.
Project Completion Date Insert Date, by 5:00 p.m.

The University of North Carolina has the right to adjust the schedule and the contractor shall adhere to those revisions provided the total number of days allotted for the project is not altered.

Project Information

The contractor shall post at the job site on a designated display board within 10 square feet of the decontamination unit, the Health Hazard Control Unit (HHCU) notification and all other pertinent licenses. The Point of Contacts for the project shall be posted and include the name, pager number or cell phone number of the following entities:

  • The Project Designer
  • The Site Superintendent/Supervisor for the Abatement Contractor
  • The General Contractor or Site Superintendent
  • The Onsite Industrial Hygienist Air Monitor
  • The Building Owner Representative
  • The Supervising Air Monitor
This section shall include the current function of the building, the location and the age of the building. The history shall include any previous building functions. Incorporate the number of floors, the number of mechanical rooms, a description of the exterior construction, type of roof, windows, and HVAC system. A description of the interior construction shall include the basic flooring, ceiling, walls and plumbing systems. Any previously abated areas including the type of material, location and approximate date of abatement and a description of the replacement material. The description of the replacement materials shall specify if the materials are non-asbestos.
The contractor shall assume full responsibility and liability for compliance with applicable federal, state and local regulations pertaining to work practices, waste handling, protection of workers, visitors to the site and persons occupying areas adjacent to the site. Work shall also be completed according to all UNC guidelines including the UNC Design and Construction Guidelines. A copy of these and other UNC guidelines may be downloaded, saved and printed from the UNC Facilities Planning and Construction website. We have directly referenced some of the more pertinent sections of the UNC Design and Construction Guidelines, the UNC Hazardous and Universal Waste Guidelines, the UNC Construction and Demolition Waste Management Guidelines and the UNC Waste Reduction Guidelines throughout the plan. It is the responsibility of the contractor to read and understand these guidelines and other federal, state and local codes and regulation pertinent to completing the work prior to preparing and submitting the bid package.

Unless modified by this project specification, specifications for work including cutting, remediation, stripping, removal, repair and disposal work shall conform to the updated versions of the following guidelines and standards, as they become available:

The following regulations and guidance published by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA):

  1. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)
  2. 40 CFR Parts 260-272, Solid and Hazardous Waste (RCRA)
  3. 40 CFR, Part 122 and 125: National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, Clean Water Act
  4. 40 CFR, Parts 260–272: Solid and Hazardous Wastes, (RCRA)
  5. 40 CFR, Subchapter J, Parts 300-373: Superfund Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Programs
  6. Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act
  7. National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Asbestos,” 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart M
  8. “General Provisions,” 40 CFR, Part 61, Subpart A
  9. “Guidance for Controlling Asbestos-Containing Materials in Buildings” June 1985. (EPA # 560/5-85-024)
  10. “Asbestos-Containing Materials in Schools,” 40 CFR Part 763, Subpart E including appendices

The following regulations published by the Department of Transportation (DOT):

  1. Hazardous Materials Transportation Act as amended
  2. 49 CFR Parts 171 through 177

The following regulations published by the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA):

  1. “Respiratory Protection,” Title 29, Part 1910, Section 134 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  2. “Safety and Health Regulations for Construction,” Title 29, Part 1926 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  3. “Access to Employee Exposure and Medical Records,” Title 29, Part 1910, Section 1020 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  4. “Hazard Communication,” Title 29, Part 1926, Section 59 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  5. “Specifications for Accident Prevention Signs and Tags,” Title 29, Part 1910, Section 145 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  6. “Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response,” Title 29, Part 1926, Section 65 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  7. “Toxic and Hazardous Substances,” Title 29, Part 1926, Subpart Z of the Code of Federal Regulations
  8. “Occupational Exposure to Asbestos, Tremolite, Anthophyllite, and Actinolite,” Final Rules,” Title 29, Part 1910, Section 1001 and Part 1926, Section 1101 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  9. “General Safety and Health Provisions,” Title 29, Part 1910, Subpart C of the Code of Federal Regulations
  10. “Lead,” Title 29, Part 1926, Section 62 of the Code of Federal Regulations
  11. Federal Standard 313A: Material Safety Data Sheets, Preparation and Submission of

The following regulations published by North Carolina State, county or town agencies:

  1. Orange Water and Sewer Use Ordinance, Orange County, North Carolina
  2. Orange County Regulated Recyclable Materials Ordinance
  3. “North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Standards for the Construction Industry,” 29 CFR Part 1926 as adopted by T13 NCAC 07F .0201 and shipyard T13 NCAC 07F.0500
  4. North Carolina General Statutes, including Chapters 95, 97, 130
  5. Town of Chapel Hill Noise Ordinance-Ordinance Number 2001-09-24/O-8
  6. The State Building Code
  7. North Carolina Construction Manual, Division of State Construction, Department of Administration, Section 112.4 Electrical
  8. North Carolina Administrative Code, Title 15A, Chapter 13 Solid Waste Management
  9. Wastewater Permit discharge requirements for UNC Chapel Hill
  10. Occupational Safety and Health Act of North Carolina (OSHANC)
  11. North Carolina Asbestos Hazard Management Program Rules as adopted by 10A NCAC 41C .0600.

The following documents published by the American National Standards Institute:

  1. “Fundamentals Governing the Design and Operation of Local Exhaust Systems,” Z9.2-1979
  2. “American National Standard for Respiratory Protection Respiratory Use – Physical Qualifications for Personnel,” Z88.6-1984
  3. “Practices for Respiratory Protection,” Z88.2-1992

Documents published by the following professional electrical engineering, fire or other associations:

  1. Underwriters’ Laboratories (UL)
  2. National Electrical Manufacturers’ Association (NEMA)
  3. National Fire Protection Association (NFPA)
  4. National Electric Code
  5. National Electric Safety Code
  6. Electrical Testing Laboratory
  7. American National Standards Institute (ANSI)
  8. Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE)
  9. Requirements for Fire Detection and Alarm Systems/Smoke Detectors Meeting the State on NC Requirements, Department of Insurance, State of North Carolina – Latest Edition
  10. ASTM International, “Standard Practice for Visual Inspection of Asbestos Abatement Projects”, E 1369-05

The following documents published by UNC:

  1. UNC Hazardous and Universal Waste Guidelines
  2. UNC Design and Construction Guidelines
  3. UNC Construction and Demolition Waste Management Guidelines

Please note where these or other referenced guidelines conflict with this specification or each other, the more stringent of the guidelines shall prevail.

The contractor shall maintain current company licenses and accreditation, and licenses and accreditations for workers and supervisors as required by applicable federal, state and local jurisdictions for removal of materials and for other regulated activity relative to the work of this contract. The contractor is also responsible for payment of all permit fees required for this project.

  1. The asbestos/hazardous materials abatement contractor will be a licensed general contractor in the specialty interior, building, unclassified or asbestos categories by the North Carolina Licensing Board of General Contractors.
  2. All supervisors shall be accredited by the NC Department of Health and Human Services (NC DHHS)/Division of Public Health/Health Hazards Control Unit (HHCU). All supervisors on the project shall have experience in the administration and supervision of asbestos abatement projects including work practices, protective measures for building and personnel, disposal procedures, etc.
    • Experience and Training: The General Superintendent must be accredited as an Asbestos Abatement Supervisor in accordance with the AHERA regulation 40 CFR Part 763, Subpart E, Appendix C and as amended February 3, 1994 (ASHARA) and be accredited as NCDHHS Supervisors. All supervisors on the project must have had a minimum of Three (3) years on-the-job training in asbestos abatement procedures and have worked at least five (5) projects, three (3) of which are comparable in complexity and size to this project.
  3. All workers performing any asbestos-related shall be accredited by the NC DHHS.
  4. Provide an adequate number of qualified personnel to meet the schedule requirements of the project. Submit to the Owner’s Representative a request for approval for any person intended to be employed in the project with said employees’ name, social security number, qualifications, “Certificate of Workers’ Acknowledgment”, and “Affidavit of Medical Surveillance and Respiratory Protection”.
  5. A minimum of one supervisor working in the project shall have attended a 24-hour respiratory protection course.
  6. One supervisor shall be provided for every 10 workers inside the containment. A minimum of one supervisor shall be provided per project per work area.
  7. Provide a General Superintendent with experience in administration, environmental remediation, demolition, and of asbestos abatement projects including work practices, protective measures for building and personnel, disposal procedures, etc. This person is responsible for compliance with all applicable federal, state and local regulations, particularly those relating to asbestos-containing materials as outlined in OSHA 29 CFR 1926.1101, and including 1926.20 through 1926.32. The Superintendent needs to be knowledgeable of the North Carolina Asbestos Hazard Management Program Rules as adopted by 10A NCAC 41C .0600. Provide full time Supervisor(s) for inside the work area with experience in asbestos abatement projects including work practices, protective measures for building and personnel, disposal procedures, etc. One of these two supervisors must be able to communicate in the language of the workers and be able to communicate in English to the Building Owner’s Representative(s). These persons are responsible for compliance with all applicable federal, state and local regulations, particularly those relating to asbestos-containing materials as outlined in OSHA 29 CFR 1926.1101, and including 1926.20 through 1926.32. The Supervisor(s) need to be knowledgeable of the North Carolina Asbestos Hazard Management Program Rules as adopted by 10A NCAC 41C .0600.
  8. Competent Person: As required by OSHA in 29 CFR 1926.1101 and 29 CFR 1926.20 through 32. This will generally be the General Superintendent if on-site on a full time basis. If the Superintendent is not on-site full time then the Supervisor(s) will be considered the Competent Person and be so trained. Trained supervisor(s) will be required to be inside the work area during all abatement activities.
  9. Submit to the University of North Carolina’s Representative a request for approval for any person intended to be employed in the project with said employees’ name, social security, qualifications, “Certificate of Workers’ Acknowledgment” and “Affidavit of Medical Surveillance and Respiratory Protection”. The Building owner’s representative and/or IH firm reserves the privilege of approving all General Superintendents and/or Supervisor(s) named for said project. The building owner’s representative and/or IH firm also reserves the privilege of requesting that any General Superintendent, Supervisory and/or workers that do not perform in an acceptable professional manner will be asked to leave the worksite either on a temporary or permanent basis.
  10. Medical: Include individually signed and notarized forms by each worker to be utilized on the project documenting that each is actively involved in a company employee medical surveillance program.
  11. Respiratory and other personal protective equipment: Copies of the most recent fit-testing and training records, individually signed for each worker shall be utilized on the project. Demolition personnel must be certified to wear personal protective equipment (PPE), including respiratory protection to complete demolition.
  12. Initial Exposure Assessment: As required by the OSHA construction asbestos standard 29 CFR 1926.1101.
  13. Abatement activities of other environmental hazardous materials will be completed only by contractor personnel that are 40-hour trained as specified in 29 CFR 1910.120 (OSHA
    Hazardous Waste Operations Training) and who have previous project experience with each contaminant included within the scope of work.
  14. Mercury abatement activities will be completed only by contractor personnel that are 40-hour trained as specified in 29 CFR 1910.120 (OSHA Hazardous Waste Operations Training) and who have previous project experience decontaminating mercury. The contractor’s employees shall receive mercury awareness training at the outset of the project that includes the identification of mercury spills, the hazards associated with mercury and its compounds and the proper personal protective equipment to use on the jobsite where mercury has been discovered. The contractor’s employees will also be informed that elemental mercury and mercury containing materials, such as organomercuries and inorganic mercuric salts, are inhalation and contact toxins that require special handling and disposal precautions. Mercury compounds are regulated by numerous statutes and regulations, particularly regarding workplace exposure avoidance and prevention of releases to the environment.
  15. Construction activities disturbing lead-containing paint requires adherence to 29 CFR 1926.62 (Lead in Construction Standard). The contractor is responsible for conducting employee airborne exposure monitoring, providing personal protective equipment, and using appropriate exposure control measures as defined by the standard. The contractor’s employees shall receive lead awareness, hazard communication, and respiratory training prior to construction work.
  16. Contractor will be responsible for ensuring that General Superintendents, Supervisor(s) and/or non supervisory (worker level) personnel are trained to address other identified environmental concerns in accordance with OSHA and EPA standards.
The contractor shall notify the following offices in writing within the time frame specified by the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations prior to beginning any asbestos removal operations.

State Agencies

Health Hazards Control Unit
Occupational & Environmental Epidemiology Section
N.C. DEHNR

(Regular Mail)
P.O. Box 27687
Raleigh, N.C. 27611-7687
Telephone: 919-733-0820
Fax: 919-733-8493

(UPS, Fed Ex, etc.)
2728 Capital Blvd
Parker Lincoln Bldg.
Second Floor / 2A210
Raleigh, N.C. 27604

The contractor will provide and install permanent, six-foot tall, chain link fencing around the building and the staging area prior to completing other work on-site. The chain link fencing will be covered with landscape fabric on one side to reduce noise, dust and visual impact. A lockable access gate to the work and staging area will be installed.

The contractor shall establish work area boundaries that will:

  1. Establish a decontamination zone to allow only authorized access to the work areas including personnel decontamination area and staging area.
  2. Ensure that unauthorized people do not enter the work area.
  3. Protect people in the vicinity of the work area from potential dangers that may exist in the work areas.
  4. Ensure contaminants are contained within the work areas.

The contractor should notify the local emergency medical services, police and fire departments in writing of the type and scope of work being performed and request that these departments make an inspection prior to beginning the work.

The contractor is responsible for supplying temporary storage required for storage of equipment and materials for duration of project. As identified in the UNC Planning and Construction Design Guidelines, the contractor’s temporary facilities, including trailer and storage dumpsters, will be maintained in the areas designated by UNC-Chapel Hill Parking Services in the Department of Public Safety (919-962-7135). Parking will be allowed in areas designated by Mr. Roy Cox.

Universal and hazardous materials and waste may be accumulated and temporarily stored on UNC property, but storage should not exceed 30 days except for extremely hazardous materials, for which arrangements should be made to remove the material from the premises as soon as is practicable. The contractor will provide locked storage for hazardous materials and waste with a clearly marked and labeled section specifically devoted to hazardous waste. Satellite Accumulation Rules should be followed until a total of 55 gallons of waste is accumulated. Once that threshold has been crossed, less than 90 day storage requirements must be implemented. The contractor will clearly identify the storage areas with proper signage and secure the area.

The hazardous and universal waste accumulation area will be pre-approved by UNC and the designer before wastes are stored there. The areas will be open for inspection by UNC Environment, Health and Safety (UNC EHS) or designer upon request. Hazardous waste accumulation area shall be locked when not in use.

The contractor is responsible for keeping the staging area secure. Waste materials will be protected from the weather and stored off the ground. The contractor will complete inspections of the waste storage area on a weekly basis and complete a daily inspection log. The contractor will keep the inspection forms in a project logbook on-site and provide copies to UNC EHS and/or the designer upon request. The contractor shall confirm that containers are secure and not leaking, and wastes are segregated into compatible groups and is properly labeled.

The contractor shall maintain an adequate quantity of spill response supplies to contain, at a minimum, 115% of accumulated waste. If a spill or leak is detected, the contractor shall immediately contact UNC-EHS. The spill or leak should be contained as soon as it is safe to contain. The contractor should clean the spilled material and contain it according to federal, state and local regulations and guidelines. UNC-EHS will assist the contractor in completing the required paperwork, including reporting and regulatory agency notification, as required.

A minimum of one first aid kit shall be located in the clean room. Additional first aid kits as the contractor determines as necessary or are required by law shall be located throughout the work area.
The contractor shall comply with the applicable recommendations of the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA) Standard 10 – “Standard for Portable Fire Extinguishers.” The contractor shall locate fire extinguishers where they are most convenient and effective for their intended purpose, but provide not less than one extinguisher in each work area equipment room and one in the clean room of the personnel decontamination unit.
If required, provide temporary toilet facilities to be used by contractor’s employees. Use of the owner’s existing toilet facilities will be at owner’s discretion and these privileges may be revoked at any time.
The contractor shall lock and tag out water equipment in the work area. The contractor shall confirm water supplies have been locked and tagged out prior to beginning work. The owner will provide water for the project. The contractor is responsible for connection to the water source and providing water to the work areas. Contractor bears the expense of getting water to the work and decontamination areas and heating that water.

The contractor shall provide temporary connection to existing building utilities or provide temporary facilities as required herein or as necessary to carry out the work.

The contractor shall employ qualified tradesmen for installation of temporary services and facilities. The contractor shall work with UNC to locate, modify and/or extend temporary services and facilities where they will serve the project adequately and result in minimum interference with the performance of the work.

The contractor shall supply hot and cold water to the decontamination units. Hot water shall be supplied at a minimum temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit.

After completion of use, connections and fittings initially installed by the contractor shall be removed by the contractor without damage or alteration to existing water piping and equipment.

Refer to the UNC Design and Construction Guidelines for further information including Chapter V – Technical Design and Performance Standards – Division 15, Mechanical Systems.

General: The contractor shall comply with applicable National Electrical Manufacturers’ Association (NEMA), National Electric Code (NEC), and Underwriter’s Laboratory, Inc. (UL) standards and governing state and local regulations for materials and layout of temporary electrical service.

The contractor shall lock and tag out electrical and Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) equipment in the work area. The contractor shall verify that the power and HVAC have been locked and tagged out prior to beginning work. The owner will provide electricity for the project. The contractor is responsible for connection of power panels and providing temporary electrical services to the work areas.

The contractor shall provide temporary facilities as required herein or as necessary to carry out the work. The contractor shall contact UNC Electric Systems for the location of the temporary service equipment, the appropriate size of any CT cabinets (if required), and associated costs for the service. Temporary service is generally provided just inside the construction site fence at an agreed point of delivery as approved by UNC Electric Systems.

Standard temporary service is typically overhead but may be installed underground depending on the construction site. UNC Electric Systems’ preferred temporary service is single-phase 120/240 volt furnished from an overhead transformer. Overhead or underground three-phase 120/208 volt, 120/240 volt and 480 volt services can be made available. UNC discourages the use of single-phase 120/240 volt service due to the associated cost.

Temporary services of 200 amperes and under are metered with self contained meters and require a standard meter base supplied by UNC Electric Systems. Temporary services over 200 amperes require current transformers for metering and require a CT cabinet supplied by the contractor.

The contractor is responsible for coordinating and acquiring all local inspections and filing an application for services with the Energy Services Business Office. The filing date must allow adequate time for UNC Electric Systems to provide the desired service.

The contractor shall provide a structure sufficient in strength and height to accept the appropriate overhead or underground supply conductors and to comply with appropriate local and NEC codes for height, voltage, clearance and utilization of power.

The contractor shall employ qualified tradesmen for installation of temporary services and facilities. The contractor shall locate, modify and extend temporary services and facilities where they will serve the project adequately and result in minimum interference with the performance of the work.

Ground Fault Protection: The contractor shall provide receptacle outlets equipped with ground fault circuit interrupters (GFCI), reset button and pilot light, for plug-in connection of power tools and equipment. All GFCIs shall be located outside the containment area. All powered equipment shall be connected to a GFCI.

The contractor shall provide a weatherproof, grounded temporary electric power service and distribution system of sufficient size, capacity and power characteristics to accommodate performance of work during the construction period.

The contractor shall install temporary lighting adequate to provide sufficient illumination for safe work and traffic conditions in every area of work. The contractor will not be allowed to utilize the existing lighting at the site during abatement of asbestos-containing materials. All light fixtures shall be cleaned and removed under the containment or wrapped with two layers of six mil polyethylene sheeting. Maintain a level of at least 75 foot candles in all construction areas. During the final visual inspection, the temporary lighting shall be maintained at level of at least 150 candle foot. Any deviations in the lighting requirements must be approved by UNC EHS and/or the Project Designer. If adequate lighting is not provided during the work process, during visual inspection by UNC EHS, project designer or IH firm, in and/or during air monitoring, the project will be shut down at the contractor’s expense until lighting is provided. There will be no additional time allotted to the contractor for the project in the event these circumstances arise. Reference OSHA 29 CFR 1926.56(b).

The contractor shall provide services of an electrician, on a standby basis, to service electrical needs during the abatement process.

The contractor shall provide additional power service and distribution service, consisting of individual, dedicated 15 amp 120 volt circuits to electrical drops with receptacle outlets
equipped with ground fault circuit interrupt protection, color coded for the exclusive use of the industrial hygiene firm. A minimum of 5 drops per work area is required. Refer to the UNC Design and Construction Guidelines for further information including Chapter V – Technical Design and Performance Standards – Division 16, Electrical – Section 16050 – General and Section 16441 – Service and Distribution.

The contractor is responsible for constructing and maintaining secure containment areas including the entry/exit areas. The regulated area shall be restricted to authorized, trained, and protected personnel including the contractor’s employees, employees of subcontractors, state representatives and other designated individuals. The contractor shall establish a list of authorized personnel prior to job start and post this list in the clean room of the decontamination facility. Abatement, remediation and demolition locations will be appropriately identified utilizing warning signs as required by OSHA and city, state, and federal regulations. The contractor is responsible for creating and maintaining a secure work area during the entire project.

The contractor is responsible for maintaining secure entry/exit locations at the facility while work is being completed.

The contractor shall maintain a logbook in the clean room area of the decontamination system. Anyone who enters the regulated area must record name, affiliation, time in, and time out for each entry.

Access to the regulated area shall be through a single decontamination system. Other means of access (doors, windows, hallways, etc.) shall be blocked or locked so as to prevent entry to or exit from the regulated area. The only exceptions to this rule are the waste pass-out air lock that shall be sealed except during the removal of containerized waste from the regulated area, and emergency exits in case of fire or accident. Emergency exits shall not be locked from the inside; however, they shall be sealed with polyethylene sheeting and tape.

The contractor shall have a company lockout/tagout program. A coordination meeting may be required with UNC Facilities where locks are required from both the University and the  contractor on the same switch gear. The contractor shall lock and tag out electrical equipment, including HVAC equipment and water in the work areas. The contractor shall verify that power and water in the work areas have been locked and tagged out prior to beginning work. The owner will provide electricity and water for the project. The contractor is responsible for temporary connection to power panels and the temporary water lines and routing electricity and water to the work areas.
The contractor is responsible for having a hot work permit program, training the workers and utilizing hot work permits. Written documentation shall be kept for each hot work permit provided on a daily log. Each permit shall be cancelled when work is completed or on a daily basis, whichever time is shorter. Cancelled permits shall be maintained by the contractor. A copy of each initial permit authorization and the cancelled permit shall be kept on-site by the contractor in a binder and provided to UNC and/or the designer upon request.
The occupants may be required by UNC-EHS to remove radioactive, biological and chemical materials and obtain clearance from UNC-EHS prior to vacating their location(s).  Documentation of these clearances may be obtained from UNC-EHS. UNC-EHS keeps documentation on a variety of environmental health and safety data including, but not limited to the following:

  1. The Hazardous Materials Management Program maintains UNC’s chemical inventory system and hazardous materials use permits. Chemical inventory reports can be generated and sorted by location and chemical-specific parameters such as hazard class, toxicity and physical state. This information may used by the contractor to evaluate recent potential sources of contamination within a lab.
  2. Hazardous waste generated on campus is processed through the UNC-EHS’ Chemical Waste Program. A representative of UNC-EHS must observe waste sampling, review all testing data and waste determinations and must sign all manifests. The waste shall be accepted, transported and disposed by one of the pre-qualified waste disposal contractors
    listed in Section 1, 1.14 – Hazardous and Universal Waste Disposal. The contractor is responsible for fees associated with transportation and disposal of hazardous and universal waste materials.
  3. The contractor is responsible for certifying, by documentation, items which are decontaminated and disposed are clean and free of hazardous materials. If such decontamination is completed to remove only a certain amount of hazardous materials to a level appropriate for a specific disposal option, this must also be documented by a proper waste determination.
  4. The UNC-EHS also tracks the use of radioactive materials and equipment on campus. A health physicist is assigned to every research project that uses isotopes and assists the
    researcher in moving materials between locations. The health physicist also coordinates terminal radiation surveys.
  5. The Biosafety Program tracks the use of biohazardous materials and assists the professors with relocation of such materials.
  6. Radioactive materials currently stored in the building will be relocated by UNC-EHS prior to the contractor beginning work. UNC-EHS will complete testing to confirm a radiation hazard does not exist in the known storage locations of radioactive material. The contractor shall utilize a radiation meter during the completion of the work to protect workers from potential radioactive materials that may be discovered during completion of the work. UNC-EHS must be notified immediately of any positive findings.
Standard laboratory decontamination methods will be adequate for the majority of the surfaces that may contain biological hazards. The contractor shall utilize NSF International/ANSI 49 methodology for decontamination of areas that may contain biological hazards. Biological waste will be placed into appropriate storage containers immediately following generation of the waste. The container shall be sealed, labeled with appropriate shipping label and stored in appropriate staging location. The contractor is responsible for coordinating biological material disposal with the pre-qualified waste disposal contractors listed in Hazardous and Universal Waste Disposal.

Decontamination of Potential Biological/Pathogenic Materials (optional)

The contractor will disinfect all biosafety laboratory suites and biosafety cabinets (e.g., biosafety cabinet work surfaces, etc.) wiping them thoroughly with a 10% bleach solution. Arrangements should be made for more rigorous disinfecting procedures for Biosafety Level II and III suites involving paraformaldehyde vapor procedures or other equivalent methods pre-approved by the UNC-EHS Biological Safety Office.

Related Documents

A mercury survey will be performed by UNC, the results of which will be provided to the contractor and will be the basis for determining which labs and areas require decontamination.
This initial survey will indicate areas of greater probability of finding mercury, but all areas must be tested during the removal of plumbing and case work. Although this survey will serve as the initial scoping document for mercury abatement activities, the contractor must be aware that during the performance of the contract, particularly during demolition activities, other areas of mercury contamination may be identified, which will be the responsibility of the contractor to properly decontaminate.

Summary

This section covers the demolition, use, handling, storage, transport, accumulation, and disposal of mercury spills and mercury-contaminated building and laboratory materials. The contractor should be aware that elemental mercury, and its compounds- e.g., organic and inorganic mercuric salts, are inhalation and contact toxins that require special handling and disposal precautions. Mercury compounds are regulated by numerous statutes and regulations, particularly regarding workplace exposure avoidance and prevention of releases to the environment.

The contractor is advised that mercury spills may contaminate asbestos-containing building materials that may be removed by the contractor. The presence of mercury above hazardous waste action levels on asbestos-containing materials requires that the material be managed as a hazardous waste. The contractor is responsible for properly accumulating, storing, and disposing of mercury-characteristic and other hazardous wastes at an EPA permitted and UNC approved Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facility (TSDF). The contractor is required to subcontract an approved UNC-Chapel Hill hazardous waste disposal contractor for disposal of hazardous waste generated under this contract. The contractor shall notify UNC and designer when UNC owned hazardous materials, not specifically identified in this contract, are discovered. Methodologies for removal and/or decontamination of the newly identified hazards will be presented to the owner and designer for approval prior to the initiation of mercury abatement activities.

Worker protection

Personal protective equipment for workers should be clearly specified in the site specific health and safety plan for the project. A minimum of Level C protection is recommended. Most of the protective measures detailed in Section 6.00 of the Asbestos Abatement Specification have general application to decontamination of mercury spills and demolition activities in the presence of mercury. Exceptions are the use of respirators fitted with mercury vapor cartridges and chemically impermeable gloves (nitrile or rubber) to prevent mercury compounds from contacting the skin.

Removal of mercury-containing intrinsic items

Manufactured or intrinsic items containing elemental mercury will be identified by the inspector and reconfirmed and removed by the contractor. Examples of intrinsic items containing mercury include: manometers and pressure gauges (e.g., Stokes McCleod gages), thermometers (laboratory and duct insertion), pumps, switches (e.g., MERCOID switches, etc.), thermostats, and fluorescent tubes (see Section 13.0A). The contractor will segregate these items from other mercury-containing waste and manage them as hazardous and/or universal after they are removed. The contractor will arrange to have intrinsic items shipped to a recycler for recovery of mercury by retort. All shipping paperwork must be signed by an UNC-EHS representative.

UNC “Controlled Materials” are defined as any material that poses a human health threat or damage to the environment. Disposal options should be thoroughly investigated for these materials and may involve recycling or reuse or disposal. Irresponsible discharges to the environment or improperly managing waste should be avoided. It is imperative that the use, handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of hazardous and recyclable materials and waste from UNC facilities and the UNC campus are consistently managed following the guidelines outlined in federal, state, local, and UNC regulations. This ensures the safety of UNC personnel and visitors and averts liability or penalties to UNC from the reckless or improper disposal or management of waste generated during the performance of the contract or during transport off campus.

The contractor shall have a mercury spill kit, mercury vacuum or other appropriate equipment on-site in the immediate location of work activities. The contractor shall clean visible mercury discovered or accidentally spilled while completing work. If mercury is detected visually or with mercury vapor detection equipment, the contractor shall immediately notify UNC-EHS and initiate cleanup activities.

Mercury action levels and regulatory exposure limits

Air Survey Action Level (ASAL): 250 ng/m3 (0.000250 mg/m3)
the concentration of mercury in the initial air survey above which action must be initiated to both identify the source and to remove or decontaminate it. Areas below the ASAL during the initial survey must also be tested during the removal of plumbing and case work. The ASAL is established at 1/100 the TLV (defined below) to provide a substantial margin of protection for building occupants and workers and to ensure that all sources of mercury are discovered. Please note that the ASAL is 4 times less than the concentration of mercury vapor allowed after decontamination is attempted to offset the limited ability to detect less volatile mercury compounds (i.e., inorganic mercuric salts) that may be present at concentrations also requiring decontamination. The contractor should include methodologies for removing these inorganic compounds in proposed decontamination procedures.
OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) for mercury: 100,000 ng/m3 (0.1 mg/m3)
Maximum allowed worker exposure over an 8-hour time weighted average.
NIOSH 8-Hour Time Weighted Average (TWA): 50,000 ng/m3 (0.05 mg/m3)
Maximum recommended worker exposure over an 8-hour period.
OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit for Methylmercury- 10,000 ng/m3 (0.01 mg/m3)
Maximum allowed worker exposure to this toxic organomercury over a 8-hour TWA. Methymercury is the metabolic product of mercury and is typically accumulated in bacterial sludge in wet sink traps.
Threshold Limit Value (TLV): 25,000 ng/m3 (0.025 mg/m3
Established by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) this is the timeweighted average concentration of mercury in the air for a normal 8-hour work day and 40-hour work week. Workers may repeatedly be exposed to this concentration without experiencing adverse health effects.
Agency for Toxic Substances & Disease Registry (ATSDR) Indoor Air Quality: 1,000 ng/m3 [0.001 mg/m3]
This is the recently established maximum concentration for residential indoor air quality published by an agency of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).
Post Decontamination Air Clearance Level (PDCL): 1,000 ng/m3 (0.001 mg/m3)
This is the concentration of mercury vapor at the surface of a item or area, which has been decontaminated, below which the item or surface requires no further decontamination and, therefore may be disposed as a non-regulated solid waste for recycling or reuse.
Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP): 0.2 mg/L
Mercury concentration in a TCLP extract (EPA Method SW 1311) of a solid waste equal to or above which the material must be managed as a mercury-characteristic hazardous waste.
Total Mercury Concentration Clearance Level: 4.0 mg/kg [4 ppm]
the total concentration of mercury in a digest of a solid waste equal to or above which the material must be managed as a hazardous waste. The level was established to afford an estimate of the TCLP extraction efficiency and is 20 times the TCLP action level. Typically this test is run in lieu of TCLP, when limited sample is available.
North Carolina Wastewater Discharge Limit: 0.0002 µg/L
The concentration of mercury in wastewater below which it may be safely and compliantly discharged to the sewer. Wastewater with concentrations equal to or greater than 0.0002 µg/L will be disposed of as hazardous. It may not be discharged to storm drains, the municipal sewer, sanitary drains in the building, or dumpsters, nor may it be poured on the ground or directly released to the environment in an uncontrolled fashion. Demonstrated decontamination procedures have not generated significant quantities of hazardous wastewater, however, if large quantities are produced, the contractor will investigate wastewater treatment options to remove or extract specific contaminants preventing it from being discharged to the sewer.
Reportable Spill Quantity
EPA’s reportable spill quantity for mercury is approximately 33.6 milliliters (approximately 2-3 tablespoons of liquid). Any quantity equal to or greater than this must be reported to the EPA and state authorities as an uncontrolled release of mercury to the environment. Reporting of any spill to the EPA and state authorities must be coordinated through UNC-EHS. Notify UNC-EHS as soon as possible after a spill has occurred. Reported releases subsequently require formal planning procedures or remedial site investigation and formal clean-up activities, which includes removal, remediation, and/or disposal of contaminated material, i.e. soil, etc.
UNC defines hazardous and universal wastes as any waste material that poses a human health threat or may cause damage to the environment. Disposal options should be thoroughly investigated for these materials and may involve recycling, reuse, or disposal. Irresponsible discharges to the environment or improperly managing waste should be avoided. It is imperative that the use, handling, storage, transportation and disposal of hazardous and recyclable materials and waste from UNC facilities and the UNC campus are consistently managed following the guidelines outlined in federal, state, local and UNC regulations and other hazardous waste regulations. Items contaminated with Hazardous material must be decontaminated and sampled to confirm the hazardous materials were removed or shall be disposed of as hazardous waste. All hazardous and universal waste disposal must be cleared through UNC-EHS. Contacts include Mike Long, Safety Officer – 919.962.5723 and Steve Parker, Hazardous Material Manager – 919.962.5509. Containers used to store hazardous waste must be approved by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT). The contractor shall supply necessary containers. The containers shall remain closed except when material is being placed into them. Each container shall be labeled with a properly completed hazardous waste label as soon as any quantity of waste is placed into it. UNC-EHS must observe waste sampling, review all testing data, evaluate waste determinations and must sign all manifests.

The contractor will comply with all regulations and conditions of UNC permits and licenses applicable to the project. Included are wastewater discharge permits and satellite accumulation requirements for hazardous waste, etc.

The contractor assumes responsibility and liability for compliance with all applicable regulations especially those affecting the health and safety of contractor employees, subcontractors, and all others at UNC during the performance of the work. This responsibility includes the protection of UNC employees and visitors located near the worksite. Prevention of damage to UNC property, supplies, and equipment from accidents, improper storage or misuse of hazardous materials shall also be avoided.

Hazardous materials and waste may be accumulated and temporarily stored on UNC property per the provision of UNC’s hazardous waste permit, but should not exceed 30 days, except for extremely hazardous materials, for which arrangements should be made to remove the material for the premises as soon as is practicable. The following conditions should be met to ensure that hazardous substances are properly managed:

  1. Hazardous waste containers should be in good condition, compatible with the material being stored in it, properly labeled at all times, and free of leaks.
  2. Adequate secondary containment should be provided for those wastes where accidental discharges or leaks could cause an environmental release.
  3. Hazardous waste accumulation areas will be pre-approved by the owner and designer before wastes are stored there. The areas will be open for inspection by the owner or designer upon request. Hazardous waste accumulation areas shall also be inspected at least daily by the contractor or its environmental oversight subcontractor and shall be locked when not in use. Wastes in containers that are leaking will be immediately transferred to a reliable container and any spilled material properly cleaned up.

The contractor should coordinate waste disposals with one or more of the UNC approved vendors listed below (as listed on the UNC website). The contractor is responsible for the disposal fees of hazardous and universal waste disposal.

Do not ship any Hazardous or Universal Wastes without EHS notification and approval. EHS must be notified to ensure that the proper paperwork, with the correct EPA ID number, addresses, and emergency contact information is used. An EHS representative MUST sign all paperwork for recycling or disposal shipments Universal or Hazardous Waste, including Bulbs.

Approved Waste Vendors as of 4/01/10:

Clean Harbors
208 Watlington Industrial Drive
Reidsville, NC 27320
336-361-3110
Clinton Atkinson
910-280-8108
atkinson.clinton@cleanharbors.com
Ecoflo
2750 Patterson Street
Greensboro, NC 27407
336-855-7925
Fernando Cruz
336-587-4634
cruz@ecoflo.com
EEI
4650 Spring Grove Avenue
Cincinnati, OH 45232
800-850-3587
513-853-3587
Heritage
4132 Pompano Road
Charlotte, NC 28216
704-564-9802
PSC
1201 Exchange Street
Charlotte, NC 28208
704-399-1744
Matt Gemmell
804-836-2706
MKGemmell@pscnow.com
Tradebe/PCI
1004 Idlewild Boulevard
Columbia, SC 29201
Mary Place
803-800-8587

Alternatives:

Lee Iron and Metal Co., Inc
P.O. Box 778
2219 S. Horner Blvd.
Sanford, N.C. 27331
919-775-7951
(For metal scrap, brass, Non-PCB Ballasts, lead)
NSB- Battery recycler
437 Ward Blvd
Wilson, N.C. 27893
252-237-3938
1-800-682-6896
Contact- Nancy
Veolia
Creedmoor, NC
919-528-3996

Hazardous and Universal Construction Waste Process

Refer to the UNC Design and Construction Guidelines for further information including Chapter IV – Supplemental Guidelines – Section B-Hazardous Material Guidelines – Sub-Section 6 – Hazardous and Universal Waste Issues. Also refer to American Institute of Architects (AIA) Specifications included in Section III – AIA Specifications – Section 01733 – Demolition and Construction for additional information.

The contractor should segregate and recycle demolition debris to the extent possible. The contractor is responsible for coordinating recycling and waste disposal. The contractor should discuss and understand the segregation requirements, the maximum acceptable material size and types/sizes of transport containers with the solid waste disposal contractors. Materials to be recycled include, but are not limited to metal pipes, ductwork, fume hoods and sinks. The contractor is responsible for coordinating construction and demolition debris disposal.

The contractor is required to submit a Draft Solid Waste Management Plan fourteen days prior to beginning work activities. The draft should be submitted simultaneously to the designer and the UNC Office of Waste Reduction and Recycling (OWRR) in order to expedite plan review. Once OWRR has communicated requested changes, the contractor has five business days to submit a Final Solid Waste Management Plan (SWMP) (UNC Specification 01505). Any deviance from the final SWMP must be approved by OWRR. In accordance with Specification 01505, each month the contractor must submit documentation (weight tickets, manifests, etc.) of the disposal, recycling, re-use, and salvage of all materials and a summary with each Payment Application. Failure to do so may delay payment. See UNC Design and Construction Guidelines for additional information concerning recycling of non-hazardous materials.

The contractor shall maintain a log that details the testing performed during the completion of this project including pH, perchlorates, peroxides/oxidizers, acids, metals, salts and other substances. A report shall be completed for each test location and, at a minimum, each report shall include the following information:

  1. Cover Sheet entitled “Project Testing Summary Report,” stating the project name, contractor project number and UNC project number
  2. Date
  3. Test Completed
  4. Location of Test Including Room Name and Number
  5. Test Results
  6. Date Samples Sent to Laboratory (if applicable)
  7. Date Sample Results Were Received From Laboratory (if applicable)
  8. Copy of the Laboratory Results (if applicable)

The contractor shall provide 3 typewritten copies of each report to UNC-EHS and the designer within one week of the test date.

The contractor shall complete the required work and certify that each area is clean and free of hazardous materials based on applicable federal, state and local regulations. Work areas and other areas should be clean and free of debris, dirt and dust following remediation activities. The contractor will not be responsible for collecting final clearance samples. A UNC representative will collect samples in certain locations to document the condition of the areas sampled. The contractor’s environmental health and safety manager shall keep a written log of areas where work was completed, the type of work, the dates work were completed in the area, the quantity of materials removed from the area and any laboratory testing completed. This information should be updated daily, kept in a binder onsite and provided to UNC-EHS and/or the designer upon request. For additional information refer to the AIA Specifications included in Section III – AIA Specifications – Section 01450 – Quality Control. Quality control documentation forms are included in this section.

At the conclusion of each phase of environmental demolition, the following individuals will walk the site together to review the completed work and check for deficiencies:

  • Architect
  • Environmental Abatement designer
  • Environmental demolition contractor
  • Construction manager
  • EHS representative
  • General contractor/CM responsible for subsequent renovation work

The architect and the environmental abatement designer will attest in writing that all hazardous material has been abated or secured according to the specifications and no remaining hazardous material will be disturbed in this space by subsequent construction activity in this space. If all hazmat has not been addressed, the architect will prepare a punch list of deficiencies to be corrected at the contractor’s expense. While fixing the punch list items, the contractor is expected to use the required protective measures necessary to complete the work as outlined by the abatement designer.

If the construction manager or the EHS representative disagrees with the clearance assessment of the architect and consultant, additional testing may be required. If this testing reveals residual contamination, the cost of this testing and additional testing shall be born by the architect and the consultant. Additional abatement expense shall be absorbed by the environmental demolition contractor.

The next phase of construction can begin in the designated work space after all parties agree on the clearance and the architect and consultant sign a document to release the space.

The contractor shall retain the full-time services of a firm with a Certified Industrial Hygienist or a similarly qualified expert (this person may be employed by the contractor as long as they have the required expertise) having experience managing hazardous substances and a background in chemical toxicology and/or mercury abatement techniques. This person will serve as the project Environmental Health and Safety Manager (EHSM). The EHSM will ensure compliance with all OSHA and EPA regulations. Duties of the EHSM shall include but are not limited to:

  1. Monitoring the contractor’s work involving the identification and decontamination of mercury for compliance with the federal, state and local regulations and the provisions of this specification. Included shall be the oversight of activities for properly characterizing, handling, storing, and transporting wastes.
  2. Monitoring air quality of the worksite and contiguous occupied spaces of the building for hazardous vapors, fire and explosion hazards, fumes, dust, aerosols, and odors, etc. The EHSM will assist in the identification and resolution of complaints from contractors, UNC employees and visitors regarding same.
  3. Provide the Construction Manager and his technical authorities with documentation of monitoring and test results impacting the progress of the work and the quality of the workplace environment, as well as test results intended for hazardous waste characterization.
  4. The EHSM will be physically present for the following activities/phases of the project related to mercury (similar specifications may be required for other hazardous materials besides mercury and asbestos):
    1. Air Monitoring during mercury abatement procedures including surface decontamination and sanitary pipe removal described below.
    2. Mercury testing and surveying to delineate the extent of previously identified mercury spills during the initial survey and/or newly discovered mercury spills that are uncovered during the demolition and removal of laboratory casework, etc. Testing must be performed during the dismantling and removal of laboratory plumbing and casework off floor at all times.
    3. Characterization of mercury-containing hazardous wastes using the project surface vapor concentrations outlined in Mercury Safety, specifically those in that exceed the PDCL.
    4. Mercury exposure monitoring involving the evaluation of the breathing zone air during all decontamination and demolition activities.
    5. Air-monitoring and sampling during all other work activities, i.e. nuisance dust sampling, fume hood sampling, etc.
Back to Introduction